Why Do Squats Hurt My Groin? All The Answers Here To Get Back On Track

L J Kudos

Why Do Squats Hurt My Groin? All The Answers Here To Get Back On Track

Squats are a great compound movement, which builds lower body strength.

However, sometimes they can cause pain in the groin area.

There are a number of potential reasons for this, which can normally be corrected with a little work on your form when doing the exercise.

Why Do Squats Hurt My Groin?

A groin strain occurs when the adductor muscles in your inner thigh become torn or inflamed. Kicking, twisting to change direction while running, or leaping are all examples of acute groin strains that can occur suddenly. There are a number of potential reasons why squats might cause pain in the groin area. It’s possible that you have a minor injury or strain in the muscles or tendons around the groin, which is aggravated by the squatting motion. Alternatively, you may be experiencing referred pain from an issue elsewhere in the body, such as the lower back or knees. It’s also possible that your squat technique is incorrect, placing undue stress on the muscles and joints in the groin area. How are your feet positioned during the movement, is there too much anterior pelvic tilt when doing the exercise and maybe you are turning your knees in which will put extra stress on the groin department? Sometimes it might be a hip impingement or weaker muscles/imbalances in the area which aren’t used as much or worked regularly enough. If you’re experiencing pain during or after squats, it’s important to consult with a healthcare professional to determine the underlying cause and develop a treatment plan.

Your form needs work

If you start to experience pain in your groin when doing squats, it’s important to check your form. Here are some key points to keep in mind:

Arch in back

When squatting, you should maintain a natural arch in your lower back. This will help to keep your pelvis in a neutral position and reduce the risk of overloading the muscles and tendons in the groin area.

Is there too much anterior pelvic tilt when doing the exercise?

If your pelvis tilts too far forward during the squat movement, it can place undue stress on the muscles and tendons in the groin area.

This is often the result of weak gluteal muscles, so be sure to focus on strengthening these muscles with exercises like bridges and single-leg deadlifts.

Turning your knees

Another common mistake is turning your knees in when squatting. This can place extra stress on the groin area and should be avoided.

This can potentially cause a serious knee injury as well as a groin strain, as anatomically speaking the knee joint shouldn’t move that way, especially with a heavy weight pushing against them too.

When you do this you aren’t activating your glute muscles as much as you should be, which can lead to lower back pain and further knee problems, as well as stability issues with the load.

Instead, focus on keeping your knees in line with your toes throughout the movement.

Some people can have their knees too far apart, which will put a huge amount of pressure on the groin as it’s too big a stretch for that area.

The general rule is to keep your knees in line with your feet, or slightly wider if it’s more comfortable for you.

If you’re unsure about your form, ask a qualified personal trainer or coach to watch you squat and give you feedback.

You might also benefit from videoing yourself squatting so that you can see what your form looks like and identify any potential mistakes.

Foot position 

When squatting, be sure to keep your feet shoulder-width apart.

This will help to distribute the load evenly across your lower body and reduce the risk of placing too much stress on the muscles and tendons in the groin area.

If you find that your feet tend to turn out when squatting, try doing the exercise with a band around your legs just above the knees. This will help to keep your feet in the correct position.

Athletic Pubalgia

Athletic pubalgia, also known as a sports hernia, is a condition that can cause pain in the groin area.

The condition is thought to be caused by a tear in the muscles or tendons around the pubic bone. 

Athletic pubalgia is most commonly seen in athletes who participate in high-impact sports, such as football or hockey.

Osteitis pubis

Osteitis pubis is a condition that results from inflammation of the pubic symphysis, the joint where the two halves of the pelvis meet in the front of the body.

The condition is thought to be caused by repetitive stress to the joint, such as that which occurs during running or kicking. Osteitis pubis can cause pain in the groin, lower abdomen, and lower back.

If you suspect that you may have osteitis pubis or athletic pubalgia, it’s important to consult with a healthcare professional to confirm the diagnosis and develop a treatment plan.

Why Do Squats Hurt My Groin?

Hip impingement

Hip impingement is a condition that occurs when the ball of the hip joint does not fit properly into the socket.

This can cause the hip joint to rub and grind, which can lead to pain in the groin, hips, and lower back.

If you suspect that you have hip impingement, it’s critical to get an evaluation from a healthcare provider to confirm the diagnosis and develop a treatment strategy.

Osteoarthritis

Osteoarthritis is a condition that results from the breakdown of cartilage in the joints.

The condition can cause pain, stiffness, and swelling in the joints. Osteoarthritis of the hip can cause pain in the groin, hips, and lower back.

Related: Why Do Squats Make Me Dizzy? Everything You Need To Know

Lower abdominals

The lower abdominals are a group of muscles that attach to the pelvis and help to stabilize the spine.

These muscles can become weak and inactive from sitting for long periods of time. Lower back and groin pain can be the result of this.

To prevent this, be sure to do exercises that target the lower abdominals, such as planks and side bridges.

Pelvic floor muscles

The pelvic floor muscles are a group of muscles that attach to the pelvis and help to support the organs in the pelvic region.

These muscles can become weak from pregnancy, childbirth, and age. This can lead to pain in the lower back, hips, and groin area.

To prevent this, be sure to do exercises that target the pelvic floor muscles, such as kegels and planks.

Lifting heavy weight

If the load you are squatting what would be considered a heavy load to you, this may be the cause of your pain, especially if your technique is off.

If you are new to squatting or lifting weights, start with a light weight and gradually increase the load as you get stronger.

If you are experienced with lifting weights and squatting with a heavy weight is not an issue, then the pain may be due to another cause.

Check to see if the pain subsides if you reduce the weight you are trying to squat. If the pain does not go away or gets worse, consult with a healthcare professional to see if there is another underlying cause.

Weak muscles or imbalances

If you have weak muscles or imbalances, this can put extra stress on the joints and lead to pain, not to mention how your body will naturally try and compensate with any movement because of this, which can lead to long-term muscular issues if the muscles aren’t strengthened.

Many people have weaker groin muscles, simply because they rarely work them in the day-to-day operation of moving around or when exercising either.

Building strength in these muscles gets overlooked by a lot of people most of the time.

If you have weaker muscles it would be well worth using a resistance band, a foam roller or try doing some isometric body weight exercises to build up the strength around the groin.

It’s also important to do exercises that help to improve your balance and coordination.

Doing mobility drills and stretching can also help to alleviate pain in the groin area.

Increasing your range of motion in the hips can also be helpful and stretch out the muscles around the groin.

One way to help with any weaker muscles or imbalances is kettlebells, which work a lot of muscles at the same time and can help to improve your coordination.

Why Do Squats Hurt My Groin?

Previous injury?

If you have had a previous injury to the groin area, this could be the cause of your pain.

Even if the injury has healed, there may be some residual scar tissue or adhesions that are causing the pain.

If you haven’t strengthened the area properly or rehabilitated the injury correctly, this could also be the reason for your pain.

Again, working on mobility drills to loosen the joint and increase range of motion will help.

Be sure to do a full body warm-up before squatting or any other exercise.

This could include doing some light cardio, dynamic stretching, and activating the muscles you will be using during the exercise.

Failing to do a proper warm-up can lead to injury.

Related: How Do I Make Leg Day More Bearable? (Everything You Need To Know)

What was trained during the previous session?

If you just did a leg workout the day before and worked the muscles around the groin area, this could be the cause of your pain.

The muscles may still be sore from the previous workout and not fully recovered yet.

If you normally rest for 48 hours between leg workouts, try giving yourself an extra day or two of rest to see if that helps alleviate the pain.

You may also want to try a different exercise or workout routine to give the muscles a break.

I have found that running a day or so before leg day has a massive effect on the groin area in particular.

This is likely because when you run, you are using the muscles around the groin a lot more than when you are just walking.

When I experienced this it was also down to not warming up before the run or cooling down afterwards that aggravated the area.

Doing simple standing side leg raises can help to stretch and strengthen the muscles around the groin and will work the hip abductors nicely.

Start with 10-15 repetitions on each side and gradually increase the reps as you get stronger.

Another exercise you can do is called the clamshell, which works the muscles around the groin, hips, and glutes.

Lie on your side with your knees bent and feet together.

Keeping your feet together, raise your top knee as high as you can without moving your pelvis.

Hold for 2-3 seconds and slowly lower back to the starting position.

Start with 10-15 reps on each side and gradually increase as you get stronger, then introduce a light resistance band when you feel able.

Final Thoughts…

There are a number of potential reasons why squats might cause pain in the groin area.

It’s possible that you have a minor injury or strain in the muscles or tendons around the groin, which is aggravated by the squatting motion.

Alternatively, you may be experiencing referred pain from an issue elsewhere in the body, such as the lower back or knees. It’s also possible that your squat technique is incorrect, placing undue stress on the muscles and joints in the groin area.

Be sure to warm up properly before exercise and to cool down afterwards. Doing mobility drills and stretching can also help to alleviate pain in the area. 

Kettlebells are a great way to work the muscles around the groin area, as well as improve coordination.

If you have had a previous injury in the area, be sure to strengthen and rehabilitate the area properly to avoid further pain.

If you just did a leg workout the day before and worked the muscles around the groin area, this could be the cause of your pain.

The muscles may still be sore from the previous workout and not fully recovered yet.

Do you feel groin pain after squats, how did you get over the issue? Let me know your thoughts in the comment section below.

If you enjoy sport and use CBD to help with your recovery in between gruelling workouts, then you are in the right place. Here at Sport CBDs, we train hard and recover the best way possible…

We have regular workouts (check out the YouTube channel), CBD news and CBD products to help you gain that edge! 

If you wanted to check out the reputable CBD we have on offer here at the site, then please head to the Sport CBDs Store (CLICK HERE). We also do fitness clothing and yoga accessories too. 

Until next time, all the best…

Beginners Upper Body Kettlebell Workout

Lee

Founder – Sport CBDs

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